Call for proposals: “Applications of Intersectionality to Critical Social Issues”

“Applications of Intersectionality to Critical Social Issues”

Editors: Kim Case, Nicole Overstreet, Lisa Rosenthal

Download PDF file of this call for proposals here.

The Journal of Social Issues (JSI) and special issue editors seek proposals for a special issue on “Applications of Intersectionality to Critical Social Issues.” This collection will focus on intersectional theory as critical inquiry and critical praxis as outlined by Patricia Hill Collins and Sirma Bilge (2016). The contributing articles will apply intersectional theory to critical social issues, making complex connections to structural and institutional forces, the co-construction of various forms of oppression, lived experiences related to intersectional identities, social policies, and more.

Defining Intersectionality (from Case, 2017):

Kimberlé Crenshaw (1989) argued that individuals occupy unique and specific social locations built upon a set of simultaneous and co-constructed identities (e.g., race, sexuality, nation, class, ability, and gender) that result in complex interactions in opposition to categorical generalizations. For example, limiting single-axis categorizations problematically treat race and gender as mutually exclusive, thereby erasing women of color. These additive and single-axis schemas reduce powerful structural forces to simplistic and inaccurate individual-level explanations for inequality. Collins’ (1990) matrix of domination offered a useful conceptual structure for unraveling situated social locations that include both disadvantaged and privileged identities.

Seeking Submissions:

Within this issue, the editors welcome a variety of interdisciplinary scholarly submissions and methodological approaches such as qualitative and quantitative studies, theoretical development pieces, etc. We invite empirical and conceptual pieces advancing understanding of intersectional theory and intersectional lived experiences, particularly with a focus on implications for and applications to social issues. We seek manuscripts that are rigorous and high quality while simultaneously presenting radical perspectives aiming to disrupt the status quo within our field and/or in society more broadly. This can include non-traditional methods such as counter- storytelling, personal narrative, community participatory action research, or case studies.

All articles are expected to integrate the revolutionary core of intersectionality and directly address applications to public policy, societal/institutional structures, and various social and cultural contexts (e.g., international contexts) within the implications section or throughout the article. We encourage diversity of study populations within articles as well as author/contributor diversity including socio-demographics, global location, career stage, and discipline.

We aim to include papers that address how intersectional theory offers applications to a range of critical social issues through many topics and lenses including but not limited to:

  • structural/systemic barriers and inequities;
  • making the invisible intersections visible;
  • activism and social movements;
  • privilege and ally behavior;
  • stereotypes and implicit bias;
  • subjugated knowledge;
  • centering the voices of the marginalized (e.g., counter storytelling);
  • challenging categorical understanding of identity;
  • social justice.

If you are interested in submitting a proposal, please note the following:

  • SUBMIT ABSTRACT– An abstract of 2 to 4 pages must be submitted to the editors by email by January 15, 2019. Abstracts/proposals should feature the working title of the proposed article, the author(s) responsible for it, together with the contact information of the author(s). Please describe what you intend to cover in your article so we can anticipate the contents and focus, as well as plan the special issue in terms of topics Issue editors and JSI editorial board will provide feedback on accepted abstracts to support development of       the manuscript.
  • The detailed abstracts should describe the theoretical underpinnings of the work, the methodological approach taken, and implications for social For empirical articles, the abstract should include descriptions of the sample, methods, and primary findings. For review articles, the abstract should include descriptions of the means by which the work reviewed was chosen (e.g., selective, supportive, exhaustive) and primary conclusions. Note that submissions must reflect on completed or nearly completed work. Proposals based on empirical research in progress (or based on future studies) would not be appropriate.
  • Send abstracts to all 3 special issue editors (please copy all of us): caseki[at]uhcl.edu; noverstreet[at]clarku.edu; lrosenthal[at]pace.edu
  • Manuscripts should be original works not previously
  • APA style- References, citations, and general style of abstracts should be prepared in accordance with the APA Publication Manual, 6th Cite in the text by author and date (Smith, 1983) and include an alphabetical list at the end. Number manuscript pages consecutively throughout the paper. Authors should also supply a shortened version of the title suitable for the running head, not exceeding 50 character spaces.
  • Although the timeline may change, we anticipate making selection decisions and sending abstract feedback within 2 months. Full-length manuscripts will be due on or after July 1, 2019. Manuscripts may be submitted early. Manuscripts submitted after this date may not be eligible for inclusion in the issue.

We do hope you will consider this invitation, and we look forward to hearing from you. Sincerely your special issue editor team,

Kim A. Case, Ph.D., University of Houston-Clear Lake

Nicole Overstreet, Ph.D. Clark University

Lisa Rosenthal, Ph.D. Pace University

A New Course: Intersectional Critical Liberation Psychology

Invited guest blog by Lisa Rosenthal, PhD; Psychology Department, Pace University

I have been slowly brainstorming about creating a new course in my area of expertise since I started teaching in graduate school. I’ve bounced around between several ideas of what it would focus on, but it has always had a clear social justice framing.

When I started my position at Pace University a few years ago, I learned that it was certainly possible to develop new undergraduate courses and felt encouraged to continue my brainstorming. I also learned about various types of courses Pace undergraduates need to take as part of core requirements and that my institution values faculty teaching, including learning communities.

A learning community at Pace involves two faculty members from different disciplines teaching the same set of students in a given semester about a particular theme or topic. This can be done either as a single integrated, team-taught course, or as two courses paired together. For the social justice-focused psychology course I was imagining, I thought a paired learning community could be perfect and pursued that option.

Many years after these ideas started brewing, I am excited that I am going to teach Intersectional Critical Liberation Psychology for the first time in Fall 2017. I will teach this course in a learning community paired with a section of Gender, Race, and Class (a Women’s and Gender Studies department course) taught by a wonderful colleague, Jason Whitesel, who is a sociologist by training. These courses paired together will hopefully provide a rich experience for students.

Why Intersectional Critical Liberation Psychology?

I believe many students want and need to learn about social justice frameworks for understanding the world. I think this has always been true, and increasingly so given the current political climate both within the U.S. and all around the globe. As an undergraduate psychology student, I learned about social justice frameworks in courses outside of but never within my own major, and I had to figure out on my own how those frameworks could be applied in psychology. I’ve always wanted to offer undergraduate students what I didn’t have.

Across my entire training and academic career, I have steadily increased my engagement with and use of intersectionality as a framework in my research and teaching, as well as in my broader understanding of the world. So I knew I wanted the course I developed to center intersectionality and how it is (and can be) applied within psychology.

I also knew I wanted to highlight traditions within psychology that have always been social justice-focused with roots outside of North America and Europe, which are very often omitted from standard undergraduate (as well as graduate) training in the field. This led me to incorporating critical psychology and liberation psychology into the framing of the course. The more I thought about it, the more I felt that intersectional, critical, and liberation perspectives were intricately linked and complemented each other in an ideal way for what I wanted to accomplish in this course. And, voila- Intersectional Critical Liberation Psychology it would be!

Developing the Course

After years of brainstorming, I had to put concrete ideas down on paper to propose the new course, which is always challenging! I worked on drafting a syllabus to propose, and found out in the middle of that process that my amazing friend and collaborator Nicole Overstreet was simultaneously developing an Intersectional Psychology graduate course (great minds think alike!?). Nicole shared her syllabus with me, and in particular her reading list helped me tremendously to finish up the draft of my syllabus.

I successfully proposed the course, and it was approved. But, I am still in the process of considering a range of options for how to teach it. I want to make sure students can understand the material and walk away with frameworks they know how to apply to the rest of their learning in psychology as well as other fields. I want student to learn things that they will apply to all realms of their lives and careers. Ultimately, I hope the course can help students to understand the world more clearly, find allies in social justice struggles, and engage in trying to make the world a better place.

I have been reading a lot to help me make various decisions about the course, including regarding readings, assignments, activities, etc. One of the first things I read was Kim Case’s book Intersectional Pedagogy: Complicating Social Justice and Identity (HUGE thank you to Kim and the other contributors for doing the work of putting this book together, it’s an incredibly helpful resource!!). I’ve also read Adrianne Aron and Shawn Corne’s edited compilation of translations of Ignacio Martín Baró’s work, Writings for a Liberation Psychology. I’m currently in the middle of Mary Watkins and Helene Shulman’s book Toward Psychologies of Liberation. And, next in the queue is Dennis Fox, Isaac Prilleltensky, and Stephanie Austin’s edited book Critical Psychology: An Introduction, Second Edition. I am thoroughly enjoying reading about all of these perspectives in psychology that I was not introduced to as a student!

I have a lot more work to do before I am ready to start teaching this course in Fall 2017. I am both nervous and excited to continue this journey, and I look forward to sharing updates about how it all goes!